Feature on St Louis Public Radio "Startup Wants to Sell Men on Something New: Sunscreen"

Feature on St Louis Public Radio "Startup Wants to Sell Men on Something New: Sunscreen"

2 minute read

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Dr. Beth Goldstein (at left), a Mohs surgeon, has partnered with her daughter, Elianna Goldstein, on GetMr's sunscreen for men.

study by St. Louis University researchers last year found that the incidence of head and neck melanoma among younger people rose significantly in recent decades — by 51%, in fact. The researchers also found that incidence was higher among males than females, and pointed to that discovery as one to take into consideration when it comes to prevention campaigns.

Elianna Goldstein points to it as a marketing opportunity to make a difference. 

The daughter of two physicians, she grew up in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, around her mother’s work as a dermatologic surgeon and a strong awareness of skin cancer. When Goldstein went to college, she roped her mom into speaking to her sorority about the issue — and even wrote papers about the fact that some college campuses in the U.S. provided students with free tanning beds.

It started with The Daily, which, as you guessed it, daily SPF 30 product for men that Goldstein and her mother launched through their new company GetMr

St. Louis on the Air, host Sarah Fenske talked with Goldstein about the inspiration behind the product and how it fits into the need for more awareness and solutions when it comes to concerning skin cancer rates.

“At age 13 I started wearing a moisturizer and tinted foundation, and it had SPF inside or sunscreen. My brothers, who are both older, they didn’t start wearing something, and so even from an early age, it was very apparent, and then even more so now, that the things that are out there for men just aren’t serving them. And we know that when you wear sunscreen every day, you’re reducing your risk of skin cancer by 40%.”

Goldstein also delved into common issues and misconceptions when it comes to the world of sunscreen — and answered questions from listeners.

Originally published to STL NPR: to listen to the full 'on the air' episode click here.

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